Spine and Neurological Surgery

Our state-of-the-art technology allows our comprehensive team of neurosurgical specialists and physicians to be progressive, creative and encourage superior excellence across the complete continuum of care for our patients.

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3366 N.W. Expressway
Bldg. D, Suite 250
Oklahoma City, OK 73112

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Your nervous system is quite possibly the most complex, intertwined entity known to man.

If you develop neurological problems that may require surgery, you don't want your nervous system - and life - in the hands of just any neurosurgeon. You want the best. And at INTEGRIS, you will find neurosurgeons with decades of experience including Stewart Smith, M.D., Jeremy T. Phelps, M.D., MBA, FAANS, Nate Stetson, D.O., M.S. and Pal Randhawa, M.D.

State-of-the-art technology allows our comprehensive team of neurosurgical specialists and physicians to be progressive, creative and encourage superior excellence across the complete continuum of care for our patients.

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Cervical Myelopathy: A compression of the spinal cord at the neck, which can cause neck pain. Symptoms of cervical myelopathy may include problems with fine motor skills (such as using your hands), balance, walking and pain or stiffness in the neck. The spinal cord is the primary cluster of nerves that runs from the head to the base of the spine.

Cervical Spinal Stenosis: A narrowing of the spine at the neck. The spine exists to protect the spinal cord, the primary cluster of nerves that runs from head to low back. Narrowing (or stenosis) puts pressure on the spinal cord and nerves. This can cause pain localized to the area or pain that may travel to your arms or shoulders, arms and fingers.

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A narrowing of the spine at the low back. The lumbar spine is composed of the five lumbar vertebrae at the low back. When stenosis (or narrowing) occurs, the nerves and spinal cord of an area can become compressed, which can manifest as pain that goes into the legs and feet. Stenosis can also limit strength and sensation in the affected area.

Degenerative Disk Disease (DDD): This occurs when a spinal disk (a structure of cartilage and a core called nucleus pulposus) begins to break down or degenerate. Disks serve as a cushion between each vertebra in the spine. When these cushions degrade, pain can occur. DDD is a form of arthritis.

Foraminal Stenosis: A narrowing of the holes (foramen) that exit the spinal column. These holes exist to allow the passage of nerves from the spinal cord to the rest of the body. When they narrow, the nerves that exit through the foramen can become pinched and can thus cause pain in the arms and legs.

Herniated Disk: This occurs when the structures (disks) that separate vertebrae move out of place (herniate). When a disk slips out of place, this can put pressure on the spinal nerves, which frequently triggers pain. Herniated disks most frequently occur in the lumbar spine or neck.

Lumbar Radiculopathy and Sciatica: A pinched nerve (radiculopathy) in the lumbar spine, accompanied by pain, weakness, numbness and tingling. The symptoms for sciatica and lumbar radiculopathy are similar, except for the location of the pinched nerve. Sciatica occurs in one or both legs emanating from the sciatic nerve, whereas lumbar radiculopathy occurs in the lumbar spine.

Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Pain/Dysfunction: The sacroiliac joint (SI joint) is where the sacrum (last five vertebrae) meets the iliac bones (the hipbones). When this joint is compromised through wear and tear, injury or even pregnancy, pain and dysfunction can occur.

Spinal Stenosis: Spinal stenosis is when your backbone becomes narrower over time. This puts pressure on the nerves (spinal cord) your vertebra was designed to protect. Pressure on these nerves can cause pain, numbness, tingling or weakness in the body.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: The carpal tunnel is the narrow opening of bones and ligaments that allow nerves and tendons to pass from the rest of your body to your hand. When the tendons of your hand become irritated from overuse or from performing a repetitive motion, they can swell, which compresses the nerves. This can cause pain, weakness, numbness and tingling in the hand and/or arm.

Gliomas: A specific type of tumor found in the brain and on the spinal cord. This tumor occurs when the supportive cells in the brain (glial cells) grow abnormally and cluster together. There are many types of gliomas depending on the region in which it grows, but common glioma symptoms include headache, confusion and memory loss.

Meningiomas: A tumor that occurs in the membranes that surround the spinal cord and brain (meninges). This tumor is not a brain tumor but is frequently classified with brain tumors due to the neurological symptoms it can trigger. Some common symptoms for this tumor include seizures, memory loss and vision loss.

Subdural Hematomas: A collection of blood between the brain and brain’s covering (dura). This collection of blood compresses the brain, causing swelling. If left untreated this can result in brain injury and death. Often subdural hematoma is a result of a severe head injury.

Epidural Hematomas: A collection of blood in between the brain’s covering (dura) and skull. This collection of blood compresses the brain, causing swelling. An epidural hematoma is usually the result of a skull fracture in childhood, causing brain damage. Usual symptoms are losing consciousness, a period of being alert and followed by another loss of consciousness.

Intracerebral Hemorrhage: This occurs when a diseased blood vessel in the brain ruptures causing blood to leak within the brain. Blood buildup in the brain can cause confusion, unconsciousness and death. Intracerebral hemorrhage can result from high blood pressure (hypertension) and is a form of stroke.

Vertebral Compression Fractures: A fracture of the bones of the spine (vertebrae). An injury can cause fractures in the spine, causing collapse. The most frequent vertebral compression fracture is osteoporosis.

Spondylolisthesis: A condition in which one of the vertebrae (bones of the spinal column) slips from out from the other one stacked on top of it. This slippage can cause a pinched nerve, which results in pain. There are many causes of spondylolisthesis, which include birth defects, traumatic injury or old age.

Spondylosis: A spinal condition that results from abnormal growths on the bones of the spine (vertebrae), the deterioration of the cushions (disks) between vertebrae and the presence of mineral deposits on spinal disks. Symptoms of this condition are pain and an increasingly limited range of motion.

Minimally Invasive Spine (MIS) Surgery: This surgical approach repairs or replaces parts of the spine through the use of minimal incisions and microscopic video cameras. MIS surgery may be appropriate for conditions such as spinal instability, bone spurs, herniated or degenerating disks, scoliosis or spinal tumors.

Anterior Cervical Discectomy with Fusion (ACDF): This procedure goes in through the front side of the body (anterior side) to fix the spinal conditions of the neck. This surgery may be appropriate for the treating nerve pain stemming from unstable, herniated, bulging or degenerating disks.

Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF): This procedure goes in through the front side of the body (anterior side) to treat disk problems in the lumbar spine (low back). ALIF may be prescribed for degenerative disc disease, spondylolisthesis, scoliosis or flatback syndrome to treat nerve pain stemming from these conditions. This is done through repairing and fusing disks.

Cervical Artificial Disk: An artificial disk inserted into the neck (cervical spine). An artificial disk may be the appropriate choice to treat cervical spinal cord compression or many different disk malfunctions, as well as the nerve pain stemming from these conditions. Cervical artificial disks also assist with range of motion and mobility.

Cervical Corpectomy: This procedure removes bones (vertebrae) and/or disks of the cervical spine (neck). Usually, these vertebrae and disks are damaged beyond repair. A corpectomy may be prescribed to treat bone spurs, as well as herniated disks. This is done to bring relief to the nerves of the neck.

Cervical Foraminotomy: This procedure goes in through the backside of the body to relieve pressure on the nerves of the cervical spine (neck). Common conditions this may treat are bulging, degenerating and herniated disks that are putting pressure on the nerves of the neck.

Cervical Laminectomy: This procedure removes a part of the vertebra (the lamina) of the cervical spine (neck). A cervical laminectomy may be done to treat bone spurs or a herniated disk, to remove pressure from the spinal cord or nerves in the spine.

Cervical Laminoplasty: This procedure alleviates the pressure on the spinal cord in the cervical spine (neck). A surgeon may perform this procedure to treat herniated, bulging or degenerating disks, bone spurs, or tumors in the neck. Removing this pressure allows space for the spinal cord, as well as relief to all the nerves involved.

METRx ® System for Minimally Invasive Spine (MIS) Surgery: This is a method of performing MIS surgery using a specific set of tools and procedures. The METRx® System is composed of specific tubes and dilators used to remove or repair slipped or bulging disks.

Carpal Tunnel Release: This procedure serves to correct carpal tunnel syndrome, which is when the tendons of the hand become inflamed and put pressure on the nerves of the hand. This can be done with minimally invasive methods to decompress the tendons in the wrist.

Balloon Kyphoplasty: This is an outpatient procedure is used to treat compound fractures in the spine. Surgeons in a balloon kyphoplasty will use an attachment with a balloon end to create space between the bones of the spine (vertebrae), which are then stabilized with medical concrete. A compound fracture is when all or part of a vertebra collapses.

Lumbar Corpectomy and Fusion: This procedure removes bones (vertebrae) and/or disks of the lumbar spine (low back) and fuses these bones to stabilize them. A doctor may prescribe this procedure to treat herniated, bulging or degenerating disks, as well as bone spurs. The goal of this surgery is to decompress the nerves of the lumbar spine and bring relief.

Lumbar Decompression: A surgical decompression of the nerves in the lumbar spine (low back). This procedure serves to help the pain from pinched nerves in the lumbar region.

Lumbar Disk Microsurgery: This minimally invasive procedure removes a portion of a herniated disk in the lumbar spine (low back). This disk usually puts pressure on the nerves in the low back, causing pain. Only the damaged portion of the disk is removed, with the rest remaining intact.

Lumbar Laminectomy and minimally invasive Lumbar Laminectomy: This procedure removes a part of the vertebra (the lamina) of the lumbar spine (low back). A surgeon may perform this procedure to treat a herniated disk or bone spurs to alleviate pressure on the nerves in the low back. The minimally invasive version of the lumbar laminectomy has the same aims but with minimal incisions, decreased blood loss and improved recovery time.

Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation: An implanted device to assist with the stability of the lumbar spine (low back) after surgery. These are usually implanted when receiving a spinal fusion to secure the vertebrae of the low back.

Microscopic Posterior Discectomy: This procedure goes in through the backside of the body (posterior side) to remove disks in the spine. This procedure is done to remove bone spurs and/or herniated disks. It is not as invasive as other procedures done to fix this issue and is frequently prescribed as a treatment for patients whose damage is less severe.

SI Joint Fusion: This procedure fuses the SI joint. The sacroiliac joint (SI joint) is where the sacrum (last five vertebrae) meets the iliac bones (the hipbones). The goal is to minimize the joint’s instability and decrease nerve pain that occurs because of SI dysfunction.

Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF): This procedure fuses the anterior and posterior (front and back) parts of the lumbar spine (low back). The procedure aims are to create more stability through making a solid bone vertebra, as well as mitigate pain and compression of the nerves in the area.

Craniotomy: This is the removal of part of the skull to access the brain for brain surgery. This section, known as a bone flap, is temporarily removed but is replaced after the rest of the surgical procedure is completed.

Vertebroplasty: This is an outpatient procedure with similar aims to a balloon kyphoplasty, just using different methods. This is also used to treat compound fractures in the spine when all or part of a vertebra collapses. The procedure stabilizes the bone using x-ray imaging, minimally invasive techniques and medical concrete.

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Happy, Healthy & Pain Free Thanks to Neurosurgeon Jeremy Phelps, M.D.

In cervical spinal stenosis, the spinal canal narrows and can compress the nerve roots or can cause damage to the spinal cord itself. Squeezing the nerves and cord in the cervical spine can change how the spinal cord functions and cause severe pain, stiffness, numbness, or weakness in the neck, arms, and legs.

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