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Heartmate 3 is an implantable device that takes over the pumping action of the left ventricle. INTEGRIS was the only health system in Oklahoma to participate in the clinical trial of this device, and one of only 60 enrolling centers in the country.

HeartMate 3 Receives FDA Approval

Thanks in Large Part to the INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care Team

INTEGRIS is a national leader for patients with end-stage heart disease and device-based mechanical support therapies to save, support and restore failing hearts.

In 2015, INTEGRIS was honored to be the first health system in the nation to implant the HeartMate 3™ Left Ventricular Assist System, the newest LVAD technology, which has set a new standard in LVAD therapy.

Heartmate 3 is an implantable device that takes over the pumping action of the left ventricle. INTEGRIS was the only health system in Oklahoma to participate in the clinical trial of this device, and one of only 60 enrolling centers in the country.

The clinical trial was the fastest-enrolling U.S. trial in history in the field of Mechanical Circulatory Support, with more than 1,000 patients enrolled for a two-year period.

Just last week, Abbott, the maker of the device, announced it had received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the HeartMate 3 for the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients in need of short-term hemodynamic support, thanks to the significant advancements reported in the clinical trial.

These advancements include a pump that is designed to reduce complications and increase pumping function of the heart while improving survival and quality of life for patients with advanced heart failure.

In the study, patients who received the Heartmate 3 device saw significant increases in their physical activity and survival rates as well as a reduction of complications.

James Long, M.D., Ph.D., cardiovascular surgeon and director of the INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care program, and Doug Horstmanshof, M.D., heart failure cardiologist and co-director of the INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care program, oversaw the primary investigations at INTEGRIS. “We are pleased the FDA has approved the use of HeartMate 3 to allow us to bring the latest, most advanced therapies to residents of Oklahoma suffering from heart failure,” said Long.

Under the leadership of Drs. Long and Horstmanshof, INTEGRIS has made international contributions to the future treatments of countless heart failure patients. The INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center nursing staff and the entire INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care team were exemplary in the training and management of the new technology platform.

In fact, out of all 60 enrolling centers in the U.S., INTEGRIS was the second-largest implanter in the clinical trial, behind Duke University Health System. The third-largest implanter was New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. To date, INTEGRIS has implanted 53 devices.