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MEDNAX, Inc. recently announced that the results of its Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) program, the “100,000 Babies Campaign,” were published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Participates in 100,000 Babies Campaign

OKLAHOMA CITY (May 5, 2016) – MEDNAX, Inc. recently announced that the results of its Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) program, the “100,000 Babies Campaign,” were published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

The study, “A Multifaceted Approach to Improving Outcomes in the NICU: The 100,000 Babies Campaign,” was authored by a multi-disciplinary team from MEDNAX’s Center for Research, Education and Quality who developed and led the campaign in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the country. Data was gathered on more than 420,000 babies from 2007 to 2013 at 330 NICUs. INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center participated in the study since its inception. 

“Our participation in the MEDNAX’s 100,000 Babies Campaign has greatly benefitted our high risk newborns, their families and our NICU staff,” says Edward Co, M.D., medical director of the NICU at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center. “We have implemented clinical quality improvement initiatives and introduced evidence-based best clinical practices in our NICU. These process and procedural changes have led to improved patient outcomes, reduced infant morbidities and mortality and decreased overall health care costs.” 

The 100,000 Babies Campaign focused on five critical clinical practices and procedures used in neonatal care: enhancing nutrition, improving medication use, reducing central line infections, minimizing mechanical ventilation and reducing suboptimal admission temperatures. 

From 2007 to 2013, the CQI program was directly associated with simultaneous improvement in processes and patient outcomes. Specifically: 
  • The campaign resulted in the increased use of human breast milk and the decreased use of commonly overused medications. 
  • In very low birth weight infants, mortality decreased by 22 percent. 
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis decreased by 41 percent. 
  • Severe retinopathy of prematurity decreased by 31 percent. 
  • Late onset infection decreased by 54 percent. 
  • Central line infections decreased by 56 percent. 
These improvements in processes and patient outcomes can have significant cost implications as well. For example, the authors estimate that the decrease in central line infections over the study period reflected a cumulative cost reduction of $58 million. 

The benefits of the 100,000 Babies Campaign are being recognized by MEDNAX’s hospital and health system partners across the country. Participating hospitals reported improved quality of care offered to women and their babies in the local communities; improved long-term outcomes and parent satisfaction; enhanced collaboration, communication, knowledge-sharing and interdisciplinary relationships amongst all members of the NICU team; and demonstrated commitment to quality improvement, as well as patient-safety and cost-efficient care.