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On Thursday, Sept. 19, INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation will host the 2019 Courage Award Luncheon to celebrate three inspirational people: Karen Bowers, Brandy Haygood and Richard Morris.

INTEGRIS Hosts Jim Thorpe Courage Awards

The INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation Courage Award was established in 1994 to recognize and honor individuals who have overcome disabilities caused by injury or illness, by facing the physical and mental challenges of rehabilitation with courage and determination. The award is named after the man known as the World’s Greatest Athlete, Jim Thorpe, and is presented annually. 

On Thursday, Sept. 19, INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation will host the 2019 Courage Award Luncheon to celebrate three inspirational people: Karen Bowers, Brandy Haygood and Richard Morris. 

COURAGE Award WinnerKaren Bowers, 50, of Stillwater was looking forward to the new year on Jan. 2, 2019 when tragedy struck. What she thought was a migraine, turned out to be something far worse than a headache. Karen had suffered a massive stroke. She could no longer speak or move the right side of her body. She would require surgery for swelling on her brain. Doctors had to actually remove a portion of her skull to relieve the pressure. The tissue was kept alive underneath her skin, until it could be re-attached. Now, just nine months later, Karen is making remarkable progress and proving to us all, that there is strength behind her silence.


COURAGE Award WinnerBrandy Haygood of Moore was just 24 years old when her young life almost ended. She was involved in a car accident that she shouldn’t have survived. She endured multiple broken bones, a coma and even a stroke. But looking at her today, you’d never know it. This spunky, social, spitfire is too busy planning a wedding to dwell on her painful past.

 

COURAGE Award WinnerRichard Morris, 59, of Choctaw was an avid bicyclist when he had a terrible accident on a mountain bike while visiting his son out of state. In an instant, Morris became a quadriplegic. He would spend a total of six months in the hospital before finally going home. Through hard work and prayer, Morris has adapted to his new normal and is living more independently than ever thought possible. He has modified feeding utensils, a modified fishing pole and even a modified lawn mower to help him do many of the things he enjoys. And staying true to his courageous spirit, he hopes to one day be able to ride a specialized bicycle. 

The annual Courage Award Luncheon will be held Thursday, Sept. 19, from noon to 1 p.m. at the Petroleum Club Event Center, located at 4040 N. Lincoln in Oklahoma City.