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The Oklahoma City Dodgers continue the 2019 “Home Run For Life” series Friday night as they partner with INTEGRIS to recognize eight-year-old Miracle Garramone during the Dodgers’ game against the Nashville Sounds at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark.

Miracle Garramone to Celebrate Home Run for Life

Second grader battles arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with help of staff at INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation


Miracle GarramoneThe Oklahoma City Dodgers continue the 2019 “Home Run For Life” series Friday night as they partner with INTEGRIS to recognize eight-year-old Miracle Garramone during the Dodgers’ game against the Nashville Sounds at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark.

Garramone was born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita — a condition that led to multiple congenital malformations in her arms, hands and legs and limits the range of motion of her joints.

The Cashion Elementary second grader from Kingfisher, Okla., has been going to physical therapy at INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation since she was less than one month old and has already endured six different surgeries.

“She doesn’t meet a challenge that is too much for her,” said Jennifer Cruz, Garramone’s guardian.

“Home Run For Life” recognizes individuals in the Oklahoma City community who have overcome a significant medical event with the help of their families, physicians and health care professionals. To symbolize the end of their battle against adversity, honorees take a home run “lap” around the bases during an in-game ceremony.

“Five times a season we are proud to welcome these extraordinary Oklahomans to take the field at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark,” OKC Dodgers President/General Manager Michael Byrnes said. “This is the ninth straight year we have partnered with INTEGRIS to honor these amazing individuals’ perseverance and courage to overcome major health challenges.”

While there is no cure for arthrogryposis, physical therapy and surgery aim to improve patients’ range of motion.

“It makes my arms and my legs different,” Garramone said of her condition. “I just tell people who ask that I was just born with it and it makes me special.”

The staff at INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation has been there for Garramone every step of the way.

Pediatric Physical Therapist Audrey Fluitt said she first met Garramone when she was 25 days old and they have worked together for more than eight years. Fluitt pushes Garramone to maintain her strength and mobility for as long as possible.

“Miracle has a lot of obstacles to overcome and she just meets every one with such a positive attitude,” Fluitt said. “She’s truly an inspiration. We try to make our therapy fun, so it’s something the children enjoy doing.”

Pediatric Occupational Therapist Angela Showman assists Garramone in being able to pick up small objects that translate to buttoning clothing, zipping a coat or using utensils to eat.

“So she doesn’t have to rely on other people to do it for her,” Showman said. “Some days it can seem really easy for her and other days it can be a struggle, but she powers through it. She really does work very hard.”

Cruz said each time Garramone grows, it’s like she has to start over with her progress and Garramone has been growing a lot lately. “She is growing, but her muscles don’t catch up,” Cruz said.

Garramone was named a 2018 recipient of the INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation Courage Award, which was established in 1994 as a way to recognize and honor individuals who have overcome disabilities and face the challenges of rehabilitation with courage and determination.

“She knows every time she’s there is one day closer to reaching all of her goals,” Cruz said. “Can’t is not in Miracle’s vocabulary — never has been. She always keeps trying, keeps trying, keeps trying. My hope is that she realizes that the world is hers and there’s not anything she can’t accomplish.

“She truly is a miracle… and every day she lives up to her name.”